In June a double-trailer semi truck skidded more than a hundred yards before slamming into the side of a passenger train crossing the Nevada desert. It was the leader in a three-truck convoy, but while the other trucks were able to stop, this truck skidded through the crossing gate and struck the train, killing six people including the truck driver.

National Transportation Safety Board inspectors have been called to the scene of the truck accident, but their report is likely several months from completion. Still, there are a number of possible causes for the accident that come from the driving history of the truck driver and the trucking company.

The trucking company had been cited for two previous crashes. In addition, one of its trucks was pulled off the road because its tires were so bald that the inspector considered it an imminent safety hazard. And there were fifteen other citations for maintenance problems, though none were so serious that they required pulling the truck off the road. Poor tire condition or brake maintenance could explain why this truck was unable to stop before the crossing, which is programmed to give sufficient warning for adequate stopping distance at the posted speed limit.

Another possible explanation for the accident is that the truck driver was speeding. Indeed, the driver had a history of speeding citations, though they were separated just far enough apart and were not quite high enough to trigger suspension of his license. He was also responsible for a dangerous accident in which he rear-ended a family car stopped at an accident on I-80, sending three people to the hospital.

Trucking companies that employ dangerous drivers or try to cut corners on truck maintenance need to be punished when this type of negligence leads to the injury or death of others. If you have been hurt or lost a loved one in a truck accident in Ohio, Robert W. Kerpsack, CO, LPA can help. To get your free case evaluation, please contact us today.