Police have already written more traffic citations at Port Columbus airport this year than they did in every one of the previous years. The increase in citations is not the result of a crackdown or change in policy–it comes from a redesign of the interchange on which drivers exit I-670 to head to the airport. The redesign was initiated to reduce traffic jams and accidents caused by inefficient routing of traffic, but the new interchange is so efficient that, according to Port Columbus officials, many people imagine they are still on the interstate and drive significantly over the speed limit. Does this make the new interchange a potentially dangerous defective roadway?

Officers had written 675 citations for drivers as of August 2 of this year, up from only 529 the previous year. About two-thirds of these citations are for speeding, with an average violation of 18 miles over the speed limit, and none less than 10 miles over. Officials worry that speeding near the airport may be very dangerous, because there are many pedestrians and drivers unfamiliar with the layout of the airport, both of which are likely to lead to more car accidents.

However, it actually seems like the new interchange may be making a positive difference, rather than a negative one. Although traffic citations are up, accidents are down. The new interchange became active in late 2010, and traffic accidents have decreased significantly in both 2010 and 2011, with only 3.7 crashes per month so far in 2011, compared to 6.9 crashes per month in 2009. Hopefully, this trend continues and the interchange results in safer driving for everyone.

If you have been injured or lost a loved one near Port Columbus or elsewhere as a result of a defective roadway design, the personal injury lawyers of Robert W. Kerpsack, CO, LPA can help. Please contact us today for a free initial consultation.