New changes to an Ohio law will change the requirements for when children can ride in the car without a booster or child-seat. One of the reasons the law has been changed is so that children do not suffer as many injuries in car accidents in the future.

At the moment, the seatbelts in vehicles better protect children that are at least 80 – 100 pounds and are at least 4 feet 9 inches tall. In past, child passenger laws simply stated that children who outgrew the limits of their forward-facing child-seats could sit in the backseat with regular seatbelts.

The changes to the child passenger law now requires all children who are younger than 8 years old or less than 4 feet 9 inches tall to ride in a properly fastened child-seat or booster seat. In the future, parents driving children who are not in compliance with the law will receive a $75 ticket. Right now, officers will simply inform parents that it is illegal for children to ride without a booster or child-seat if they are below the requirements.

The changes to this law should help curb the number of child whiplash, brain injures, and other serious injuries. The changes to the law will take place on October 7, 2009.

If you have a child that has been injured during an auto accident, you may be able to recover compensation from the negligent driver. Please contact one of the experienced auto accident lawyers at Robert W. Kerpsack Co., L.P.A. to schedule an initial claim evaluation.